Common Sea Fans (<em>Gorgonia ventilina</em>) are one of several species of sea fans found in southeast Florida. Sea fans are also classified as soft corals or gorgonians.

Common Sea Fans (Gorgonia ventilina) are one of several species of sea fans found in southeast Florida. Sea fans are also classified as soft corals or gorgonians.

Photo: Chantal Collier

Juvenile bluehead wrasses swim along the reef in Palm Beach.

Juvenile bluehead wrasses swim along the reef in Palm Beach.

Photo: Joe Marino

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Southeast Florida Reef News

Land Based Sources of Pollution (LBSP) Update: Completion of two outreach products concerning LBSP impacts on coral reef ecosystems.

Katharine Tzadik & Troy Craig
Environmental Project Coordinator & Program Assistant

The awesome new
The awesome new

We are proud to announce the completion of one LBSP project to “Educate and inform all stakeholders concerning the value and importance of the coral reef ecosystem of Southeast Florida, land-based sources of pollution, pollution impacts on the resource, and the strategies recommended to address the problems”. Outcomes of this project came in the form of two products; a fertilizer and pesticide brochure, and a Watershed poster.

The purpose of the project was to directly address the issue of lack of public awareness regarding land-based sources of pollution and its effect on coral reefs through the development of educational materials. One concern specific to southeast Florida coral reefs is the use of fertilizers and pesticides, especially as a non-point source of pollution, and how to manage the issue. The brochure was developed with input from several contributing organizations including, the LBSP Project Team, the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) local extension, and UF’s Environmental Horticultural Department. This brochure is being distributed to plant nurseries and public gardens throughout the SEFCRI region, and is available in both Spanish and English.

Also, southeast Florida has a very unique system within its watershed that connects the land, the sea and the people. The associated water flow across and under the land to coral reefs, can carry pollutants that degrade coral reefs. Due to this connectivity, people’s actions can impact natural resources further downstream, but even small and simple changes in human behavior can minimize these detrimental effects. The CRCP and LBSP team helped design a Watershed Poster to highlight the issues and associated impacts, but also created guidelines on how to protect south Florida’s watershed and subsequently minimize the threats to coral reefs. Posters in both English and Spanish have been sent to school districts and educational centers.

If you are interested in any of the products please contact coral@dep.state.fl.us for more information.



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